August Newsletter – Tradie Health

A tradies’ health is their most important tool, yet Australian tradies experience some of the highest rates of injury and time off work compared to other workers. In fact, 3 in 5 serious workplace injuries involve a tradie, despite tradies making up only 30 per cent of the Australian workforce. The Australian Physiotherapy Association is encouraging all tradies, their employers and families to think about their health and take a few simple steps to prioritise their wellbeing at work.

Physically demanding trade jobs can cause and exacerbate a range of injures. It’s not surprising that tradies are overrepresented in workplace statistics compared to other workers. The average time off work due to serious workplace injury is 5-6 weeks, which is time many tradies simply can’t afford.

To help reverse these statistics, we need to take a good look at the workplace culture and practices of many tradies and encourage them to focus more on their health and safety. Quite simply, tradies rely on their bodies for work—their bodies are their primary work tool. If it breaks down or becomes incapacitated through injury or chronic illness, they can’t work to their full ability.

If you know a tradie who needs some attention, give Motion Health a call on 03 9825 2697

September Newsletter – Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome – A pain in the behind

What is GTPS
Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome GTPS is common cause of hip pain affecting the outer portions of the hip, thigh, or buttock regions of the body. People experiencing GTPS commonly report painful symptoms over the posterior aspect of their hip joint or buttocks when sitting or standing for Long periods of time, climbing stairs or lying on the affected side.

What is the source of the pain:
GTPS is an umbrella term that encompasses inflammatory or degenerative changes to the gluteal muscle tendons and/or inflammatory responses to the gluteal bursae . Previously people with the symptoms were often given the narrow diagnosis of hip bursitis and treated with cortisone injections into the bursea alone. The classification of GTPS takes a more expansive approach and includes the often involved tendons to the glute medius and glute minimus tendons where they attach onto the top of the thigh bone.

What are the symptoms of GTPS:

The main symptoms reported by people experiencing GTPS include pain to the outside of the gluteal muscles or side of the thigh that is typically described as a deep ache type pain. It may progress gradually over time or be brought on by a traumatic event such as a fall onto the affected side.
Aggravating activities Of GTPS pain include:
Pain when walking/running
Pain when sitting particularly in low chairs for long periods of time
Pain when standing for prolonged periods of time
Pain when walking up/down steps
Pain when lying on the affected side

What are the treatment options for GTPS:
Physiotherapy in the form of Deep Tissue Massage, stretching and strengthening provides the front line treatment of GTPS.

If you have any concerns, please give Motion Health a call on 03 9825 2697

References:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4761624/

October Newsletter – Exercise Considerations for the Pelvic floor

pelvic floor physiotherapy

The pelvic floor refers to the group of muscles that run from the pubic bone at the front of the pelvis to the coccyx (tailbone) at the back of the pelvis. This group of muscles play an important role within the body. The pelvic floor is responsible for voluntary control of urine, faeces and flatulence, sexual functions and maintaining support of the pelvic organs such as the uterus in women and the bladder and bowel in both men and women. It also very importantly forms part of our deep core system along with the diaphragm and the transverse abdominus (deep abdominals) and multifidus (deep spinal muscles). During exercise the pelvic floor, diaphragm and deep abdominal and spinal muscles work in a coordinated manner to control the pressure within the core system in response to load.

In the ideal situation, the coordination of pressure within the abdomen happens automatically. When lifting a weight, the muscles of the ‘core’ work together well- as you lift the load, you exhale (diaphragm ascends), the pelvic floor should contract and the deep abdominals and spinal muscles contract to provide support for the spine. In this scenario, the pelvic floor muscles respond appropriately to the increase in abdominal pressure. If the pelvic floor is not working optimally, a loss of function can result.

Common symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction include:
– Accidentally leaking urine when you exercise, laugh, cough or sneeze
– Needing to get to the toilet in a hurry or not making it there in time
– Constantly needing to go to the toilet
– Finding it difficult to empty your bladder or bowel
– Accidentally losing control of your bladder or bowel
– Accidentally passing wind
– Pain in your pelvic area
– Painful sex.
– A prolapse:
– in women, this may be felt as a bulge in the vagina or a feeling of heaviness, discomfort, pulling, dragging or dropping
– in men, this may be felt as a bulge in the rectum or a feeling of needing to use their bowels but not actually needing to go

(Source: Pelvic floor first – http://www.pelvicfloorfirst.org.au/pages/how-can-i-tellif-i-have-a-pelvic-floor-problem.html)

The pelvic floor can change at different stages of life and can sometimes become weakened and not work optimally. Some of the groups of people that may commonly experience pelvic floor dysfunction include: pregnancy, post natal, menopause, people on hormone replacement therapy, people completing frequent high impact activities (heavy lifting, jumping), chronic coughing/sneezing.

If you have any of these symptoms, we recommend contacting a Pelvic floor Physiotherapist to assess your individual condition. Once you know what you need to work on then our qualified practitioners can assist you work towards your goals and maintain the health of your pelvic floor.