July Newsletter – National Diabetes Week 8 -14th July

diabetes week

Did you know that exercise not only reduces your risk of diabetes by up to 60% but also plays a vital role in the management of the condition?

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus – T1DM
In T1DM the body is unable to produce insulin due to compromised cells in the pancreas. This results in elevated blood glucose levels (BGL), as the body without insulin is unable to absorb and use the glucose for energy.

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus – T2DM
T2DM is often known as lifestyle diabetes, and is a permanent health condition that occurs as a result of sustained elevated blood glucose (sugar) levels. Over time the body becomes increasingly glucose intolerant as the body is not able to produce sufficient amounts of insulin to regulate blood glucose levels.

Some things to know about diabetes:

Excess weight and sedentary lifestyle are two of the main risk factors for T2DM. Over 80% of people diagnosed are considered to be overweight or obese.

Abdominal weight dramatically increases your risk of diabetes. Weight held around the midsection is a major risk factor and can impact on the function of your vital organs. The highest risk occurs when waist circumference is over 94cm for males and 88cm for females.

Diabetes can lead to complications and further chronic conditions. Both type 1 and 2 diabetes increases one’s risk of developing further complications and/or conditions. This can be reduced with correctly prescribed exercise.

Lifestyle modification can be just as effective as medication. Studies show that diet and exercise interventions can work just as well as some common medications. It is also important to note that while taking medication, exercise is still required to manage BGLs.

Accredited Exercise Physiologists (AEP) are expertly trained to help manage diabetes. AEPs are the peak allied health professional to prescribe exercise for diabetes and other chronic conditions. An AEP will be able to tailor an individual management plan, by completing a thorough assessment, including medical history, medications, and necessary GP correspondence.

At Motion Health we have Exercise Physiologist’s who can help you mange your diabetes, whether through 1:1 sessions, group classes or as part of our type 2 diabetes management group. You may even be eligible for a Medicare rebate or rebate through your private health.

June Newsletter – Asthma

heart health

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways associated with airway narrowing and obstruction. It is commonly provoked by triggers including allergens (e.g. pollen, dust, animal fur), pollution (e.g. car fumes, fumes from industrial waste), exercise or stress. During an asthma episode, the airways become hyper-responsive, leading to narrowing of the airways and obstruction of airflow. This causes symptoms such as wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness and coughing. Asthma symptoms can be reversed either spontaneously or with medication

The 3 main factors that cause the airways to narrow are:
1. Swelling of the inside lining of the airways
2. Increased mucus production combined with products of inflammation (e.g. histamine)
3. Tightening of the muscle around the airways (bronchoconstriction)

Asthma is primarily managed through an “Asthma Action Plan” developed by the patient’s G.P. The Asthma Action plan is a written set of instructions developed for each asthma patient outlining medication requirements, methods for recognising worsening asthma symptoms, and what to do in the event of an attack.

There are 3 main types of Asthma medications used:
Controllers: usually taken daily in an effort to reduce the inflammatory processes associated with asthma
Relievers: effective in relieving airway narrowing; should be inhaled only when needed and in the lowest dose necessary.
Preventers: may also be used daily to reduce both symptoms and asthma attacks. Preventers can be particularly effective in reducing exercise-induced airway narrowing in most patients.

For people with well-controlled Asthma (i.e. minimal symptoms or flare ups) exercise is a safe and effective way to improve aerobic fitness and reduce the likelihood of an exercise-induced attack. By using pre-exercise medication, most people with asthma can participate in physical activity at a similar level to people without asthma. A specific benefit of a physical training program is that it allows people with Asthma to exercise with less bronchoconstriction at the same exercise intensity, although it does not abolish or reduce airway hyper-responsiveness.

The role of exercise is to assist people with Asthma to lead as normal a physical lifestyle as possible, including participation in sports. Regular exercise should be part of the lifestyle of all humans to maintain health and fitness. A major benefit of regular exercise for asthmatics is improved aerobic fitness (i.e. VO2max). This means that a given level of exercise can be carried out at a reduced percentage of his or her VO2 max, so providing a greater exercise threshold before exercise induced Asthma appears. Psychological benefits ensue and many asthmatics have become elite athletes, and world and Olympic champions despite some having severe asthma. Between episodes of asthma, many asthmatics sustain a healthy cardiorespiratory system that does not interfere with physical performance. If significant airways constriction occurs, exercise performance will be impaired.

If you would like more information on how to start an exercise program to manage your Asthma, it is important to see the right professional to ensure you are exercising appropriately. An Accredited Exercise Physiologist will be able to conduct appropriate exercise testing and prescribe a program tailored to your current fitness levels while taking into consideration your medical history and any physical limitations. Call Motion Health on 03 9825 2697 for further information

May Newsletter – Winter Motivation

Winter is finally upon us. The days are colder and daylight hours are getting shorter. It is also the time of year where exercise tends to take a back seat to more inviting options such as a warm fire place or a good movie. It is important to maintain some form of regular physical activity at all times of the year. In winter there tends to be a higher incidence of illness due to viruses such as the common cold. Physical activity can have positive benefits on our immune system. Moderate intensity exercise has been associated with a 1/3 reduction in contracting an upper respiratory tract infection compared with individuals that had an inactive lifestyle (Nieman et al. 2011). This is in addition to the other benefits of exercise such as improved strength, mobility and psychological aspects such as quality of life.

There are many options for exercise these days that don’t involve being prey to the outdoor elements. You can do aerobic based activity such as exercise on a treadmill, elliptical trainer or stationary bike as well as strength based activities such as weight training, Pilates or Yoga. Here at Motion Health we can offer a number of indoor based options for exercises. Our group classes utilise a variety of equipment including traditional Pilates reformers, wunda chairs and trapeze table as well as gym equipment such as cables, dumbbells, kettlebells and stationary bike. So whatever your needs, let us help you find your movement and support you through a warmer, healthier winter.

Give reception a call on 03 9825 2697 if you’d like more information about any of our services.

Reference:
Nieman DC, Henson DA, Austin MD and Sha W (2011) Upper respiratory tract infection is reduced in physically fit and active adults. British Journal of Sports Medicine 45:987-992.

April Newsletter – Exercise & Cancer

exercise and cancer

The Role of Exercise in Cancer Treatment

Cancer is a term that describes a disease in which abnormal cells multiply in an uncontrolled manner. There are many forms of cancer though the most common types include prostate cancer, bowel cancer (colon and rectal cancers), breast cancer, melanoma of the skin, and lung cancer. Most people would know of someone in their community that has some form of cancer, be it a family member, a friend, work colleague or you personally are affected.

Although there have been advances in cancer treatment over the years, treatment-related side effects are still common and may persist for long-term survivors. Common side effects of treatment include fatigue, pain, impaired immune function, non-optimal changes in body weight and composition, worsened bone health, fluid build-up that causes swelling in various body parts (lymphoedema), and gastrointestinal (bowel) changes. All of these side effects can greatly impact on quality of life and activities of daily living. This can also impact loved ones or carers of those with cancer and further the burden.

Exercise plays a vital role in both the prevention and treatment of cancer. Exercise can assist to improve aerobic capacity, increase strength, improve bone density and body composition as well as have benefits of psychological status. An appropriately qualified health professional such as an Accredited Exercise Physiologist can assist in designing and implementing an exercise program that is appropriate for the stage of cancer treatment that a patient is at (i.e. during and post-treatment).

Recently, the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia received media attention when they released a position statement on exercise in cancer care. The main recommendations that came from this position statement were the following:

“Exercise to be embedded as part of standard practice in cancer care and to be viewed as an adjunct therapy that helps counteract the adverse effects of cancer and its treatment”

“All members of the multidisciplinary cancer team to promote physical activity and recommend people with cancer adhere to exercise guidelines”

“Best practice cancer care to include referral to an accredited exercise physiologist and/or physiotherapist with experience in cancer care”

At Motion Health, we have a team of Accredited Exercise Physiologists that are passionate about giving you quality exercise services and care. If you know someone with cancer that would like to improve their quality of life and physical capacity then contact reception at Motion Health to organise an appointment.

January Newsletter – Pregnancy & Exercise

Pregnancy is a time of many physical and emotional changes for women. Perhaps you are wondering whether or not you should be exercising during this time. Fortunately, there is a lot of research indicating that physical activity is not only safe but beneficial for expectant mothers. Exercise can help keep pregnancy weight gain in an acceptable range, reduce the severity of musculoskeletal pain, prevent or control gestational diabetes and reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia. Exercise may also assist mothers have less complications during pregnancy and labour.

During pregnancy, ligaments and tendons throughout the body stretch, both to accommodate the growing baby and to allow the baby an easier passage out during labour. This soft tissue laxity can lead to aches and pains, particularly in the lower abdomen, pelvis and lower back and possibly increase risk of injury. That doesn’t mean women shouldn’t exercise at all. If active prior to pregnancy, women can continue exercising at the same level although sedentary women should ease into activity slowly. It is recommended that all pregnant women should avoid certain types of activity such as contact sports, heavy lifting and high level balance activities.

Pregnant women are also prone to dizziness due to the rising hormones in the body that cause the blood vessels to relax and widen. This can cause blood pressure to be lower and temporarily cause dizziness. This is one important consideration for pregnant women engaging in exercise. It is important to choose an exercise intensity that will improve health without putting them or their baby at increased risk.

Every woman and every pregnancy is different. The severity and duration of pregnancy-related symptoms will vary depending on how far along into pregnancy a woman is as well as any co-morbidities that may be present. Medical clearance from a G.P or Obstetrician is recommended when a history of miscarriage or any existing medical conditions (e.g. Diabetes) is present. For the vast majority of expectant mothers though, exercise has many benefits and is an excellent way to withstand the rigours of pregnancy.

Pilates is an excellent choice of exercise for pregnant women. Some benefits that one may see from practicing Pilates during pregnancy include:

Improved postural control
Increased core and pelvic floor strength
Reduction of lower back and or pelvic pain
Increased endurance to withstand activities of daily living

Please contact us for further information on how we may be able you.

March Newsletter – Diabetes & Exercise

Did you know that exercise can not only reduce your risk of diabetes by up to 60% but also plays a vital role in the management of the condition?

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a permanent health condition that occurs as a result of sustained elevated blood glucose (sugar) levels. As a result the pancreas is required to release increasing amounts of the hormone insulin, which is responsible for keeping blood glucose levels normal. After many years of this cycle the pancreas is no longer able to produce sufficient amounts of insulin to regulate blood glucose levels, which begin to increase ever higher. These high levels of blood glucose cause damage to both small and large blood vessels and can lead to nerve damage in the peripheries (loss of sensation and circulation in the feet), eye damage and stiffened arteries. T2DM also increases the risk of developing other conditions such as cardiovascular disease.

Two of the main risk factors are excess weight and physical inactivity. Over 80% of people diagnosed with T2DM are considered to be overweight or obese. The highest risk occurs when waist circumference is over 94cm for males and 88cm for females. This is due to excess fat stores producing toxins which make insulin less effective. This is particularly the case when weight is held around the middle of your body, impacting on the function of your vital organs.

T2DM is managed through lifestyle modification, that is diet and exercise and if necessary through prescription medication. Keeping a blood glucose diary can also help you keep track of how you are managing your condition and learning how your body responds to exercise and different foods.

There is a range of different medication prescribed in regards to diabetes management. It is important to understand how your medication works and how it will relate to exercise. This will help you to avoid hypoglycaemic episodes (low blood sugar) and better understand when, how often and how intense you should exercise.

Exercise is a key component to lifestyle management of this condition. Aerobic and resistance training are both effective but in different ways. For example aerobic exercise has been show to improve insulin sensitivity – the hormone released in response to glucose intake to remove sugars from the blood. Resistance training helps increase muscle size increasing the amount of energy that can be stored in the muscle itself rather than the blood stream.

If you or anyone you knows has T2DM talk to an Exercise Physiologist at Motion Health. We have a T2DM group that is eligible for medicare rebates with a GP referral along with 1:1 and group exercise physiology session that can be structured to assist your diabetes management. If you already attend Motion Health speak to us about how this can be included in your current exercise classes.

February Newsletter – Private Health Insurance Reforms

private health insurance reforms

Pilates Rebates

You may remember the government announcement late last year regarding a reform package for the Private Health Insurance sector.

Commencing April 2019, private health insurance will no longer cover natural therapies, including aromatherapy, Bowen therapy, Buteyko, Feldenkrais, herbalism, homeopathy, iridology, kinesiology, naturopathy, Pilates, reflexology, Rolfing, shiatsu, tai chi and yoga.

However the APA (the Australian Physiotherapy Association) have advised that members should not be unduly concerned about the removal of Pilates from the list of rebateable natural therapies. Any physiotherapist delivering a one-on-one or group consultation on any patient(s), whether it be classed as Pilates or something else, is unaffected by the PHI reform package. Their patients’ ability to claim for the service will be unaffected. The same will apply to accredited Exercise Physiologists.

The APA understands that physiotherapists who incorporate Pilates treatment into their overall management of patients do so with a full understanding and assessment of the patient’s condition, and with ongoing reassessments and modifications to the patient’s treatment as required.
Physiotherapist-instructed Pilates is one part of a wider range of treatment options utilised by our members in these instances, and is in line with the best practice, evidence based contemporary care that physiotherapists employ.

The reform package measures have been set with the understanding that there is a clear difference between physiotherapist-instructed Pilates programs and those used by other practitioners. As a result, physiotherapists utilising Pilates methods in their patient treatment plans will not be affected by these changes.

All of our staff here at Motion Health fall under the category of Accredited Physiotherapists and Exercise Physiologists.

November Newsletter – Exercise for Heart Health

heart health

EXERCISE FOR THE HEART

It can be daunting trying to understand what you should and shouldn’t do if you have some form of heart disease. Exercise often falls in this category with conflicting advice given on what is safe and appropriate.

Correctly prescribed exercise can be used in two ways: – to prevent the development of heart disease and to help treat and manage the disease and symptoms. Research indicates that correctly used exercise can be as effective as common medications in managing theses conditions. Heart disease is currently the leading cause of death in Australia, killing one person every 12 minutes.

Two of the most common forms of heart disease are:
Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) – occurring when the heart can no longer effectively pump blood to the lungs and rest of the body.
Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) – occurring when the blood flow through the coronary arteries, which supply the heart muscle with oxygen, is restricted.

Exercise is vital to manage the above conditions but also one of the best ways to help prevent them.
For example:
Regular exercise can help reduce the LDL (bad cholesterol) build up in your arteries and increase the HDL (good cholesterol) which works on top of this to further remove LDL deposits.
With as little as three minutes of appropriately prescribed exercise you can reduce your systolic (the upper value) blood pressure immediately, an exercise session can reduce your BP for up to 24 hours. Frequent exercise can provide a chronic effect of lowering your blood pressure. All of which reduce your risk of heart disease.
High blood pressure is one of the biggest risk factors for heart disease.

As your blood pressure increases above the normal range of 120/80mmhg your risk of CVD (Cardiovascular Disease) also increases. It is also important to remember that not only does your risk of CVD increase dramatically if you don’t meet physical activity guidelines but it also increases with more sedentary time.Current guidelines state that you should aim for 150minutes (2.5hours) of moderate intensity activity each week. That is exercise that makes you breathe harder and makes your heart beat faster, but still allows you to hold a conversation without getting short of breath.

Exercise can be made up of aerobic exercise or resistance training. Both work in different ways to help reduce your risk or treat your symptoms of heart disease.

If you have a chronic disease it is recommended that you consult an Accredited Exercise Physiologist before you commence exercise as they will being able to conduct the appropriate exercise testing and prescribe a program tailored to your functional capacity, physical limitations, and exercise and medical history.

If you don’t have a chronic condition but are interested in reducing your risk and improving your health it is important to remember that any exercise is better than none. Find something that you enjoy and feel comfortable doing. If you need advice on setting goals or a plan, or even a program prescribed for you; an Accredited Exercise Physiologist or Accredited Exercise Scientist are ideally trained to assist.

Exercise Physiology is an effective way to manage chronic disease and injury. At Motion Health we specialise in Exercise Physiology and will discuss a program that suits your lifestyle, age and fitness. We are open 6 days a week.

October Newsletter – Exercise for Bone Health

exercise for bone health

Bone forming cells decline after the age of 35 years. Low bone mass is of concern as it can increase the likelihood of bone fractures.

Low bone mass is diagnosed with a DEXA scan and is categorised into two categories:
– Osteopenia: a bone density score between -1.0 and -2.5
– Osteoporosis: a bone density score -2.5 or more..

Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones become weak and can break from a minor fall, or in severe cases, a simple action like sneezing.

Women tend to lose bone density earlier in life than males and can experience a rapid decline of bone density after menopause because the effects of oestrogen withdrawal. Oestrogen deficiency at menopause alters the bone resorption and bone formation meaning that the bone loss exceeds the rate of bone building. Women can lose up to 20% of their bone density in the first 5 to 7 years following menopause. Men are not exempt from this condition with the rate of their bone resorption to formation ratio decreasing typically at 70 years of age

The most common risk factors include hereditary, estrogen deficiency, physical inactivity, low muscle mass/strength, smoking, alcohol, low calcium intake, low Vit D exposure and history of fractures. Low bone density can also be the result of medications (particularly steroid based medications) or other conditions (cystic fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, anorexia). Fractures resulting from Osteoporosis are most likely at the hip, spine and wrist, but any bone can be affected.

There is strong evidence to prove that appropriate exercise training is vital in slowing the decline of bone density as well as reducing fracture risk in those diagnosed as Osteoporotic or Osteopenic. Regular aerobic, weight bearing, posture, balance and resistance training all play an important role in addressing different factors in treating low bone density and the associated fracture risk.

The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends the following steps to optimise bone health and help reduce risk of Osteoporosis

1. Obtaining the appropriate age related amounts of calcium and Vitamin D a day
2. Engaging in regular weight bearing and muscle strengthening exercise training
3. Avoiding tobacco use and excessive alcohol intake
4. Becoming educated about bone health
5. Having a bone density examination and taking medication when recommended.

Current exercise guidelines state you should aim for 150minutes (2.5hours) of moderate intensity activity each week. That is exercise that makes you breathe harder and your heart beat faster, but still allow you to hold a conversation without getting short of breath. It is important to see the right professional to ensure you are exercising appropriately.

If you have been advised that you have low bone mineral density, it is recommended you consult an Accredited Exercise Physiologist before you commence exercise as they will be able to conduct the appropriate exercise testing and prescribe a program tailored to your functional capacity, physical limitations, and exercise and medical history.

If you don’t have any bone density concerns but are interested in reducing your risk and improving your health it is important to remember any exercise is better than none. Find something that you enjoy and feel comfortable doing. If you need advice on setting goals or a plan, or even a program prescribed for you, an Accredited Exercise Physiologist or Accredited Exercise Scientist are ideally trained to assist.

Exercise Physiology is an effective way to manage chronic disease and injury. At Motion Health we specialise in Exercise Physiology and will discuss a program that suits your lifestyle, age and fitness. We are open 6 days a week.

September Newsletter – Falls Prevention

Falls and fall related injuries are among the most serious and common medical problems experienced by older adults. The statistics show that nearly one-third of older people fall each year, and half of them fall more than once. These falls can result in hip and other fractures, head injuries, and soft tissue damage. Even the least physically damaging of falls can impact psychologically with loss of confidence. Especially with hip fractures, recovery is often incomplete and overall health deteriorates.

Falls prevention is a variety of actions to attempt to help reduce the number of accidental falls suffered by older people. Research shows that multifactorial intervention programs are the most successful. Research is continuing in this area, but at present preventative measures yielding the greatest results include strength and balance training, home risk assessment and reviews of current medication (specifically those that have an effect on balance and muscle control).

At Motion Health our practitioners have recently spent some time reviewing the topic of Falls Prevention. In particular, we have implemented a strength & balance program as a preventative measure for our older clients, and for Post-falls; to reduce the likelihood of further falls.

On assessment, we consider many contributing factors as risks for falls:

  • Biological Risk Factors: Such as mobility problems due to muscle weakness or balance problems, chronic health conditions such as arthritis or stroke, vision changes and vision loss, and loss of sensation in the feet.
  • Behavioural Risk Factors: Such as inactivity, Side effects, and interactions of medications, and alcohol use
  • Movement pattern Testing/Screening: Such as Gait, Sitting → Standing, and Squatting.

At Motion Health we are lucky to have a studio perfectly equipped to address the needs of each individual client assessed. We can make use of stable equipment to develop muscular strength, challenge co-ordination with specific drills, correct movement patterns such as squatting and sit → Stand, provide balance challenges with both stable and unstable surfaces, teach gait based exercises to improve confidence in walking, and maintain or improve the mobility in relevant joints such as the ankles, knees and hips.

If you are interested in being assessed for our Strength & Balance class or know someone who may benefit, please contact us to speak to our friendly reception team on your next visit or call 03 9825 2697.